Sorry, but there are a lot of errors in this article. There were plenty of translations between the Vulgate and the King James, including in Syriac and Arabic, not to mention English. The KJV (along with the Book of Common Prayer) is at the origin of modern English, just as Luther's Bible for German and Marot's translation for French.

What has "altered" the text is the discovery of partial or complete manuscripts , which have been codified into a "standard" Greek text. As this evolves with scholarship, so do the translations. However, this has had little doctrinal impact.

You promise to discuss ten alterations but you don't list them. New translations are not alterations. They seek to convey the meaning of the original, and may do so well or badly. The original texts are often thought to have been altered on purpose or by accident. However, the discovery of Old Testament books among the Dead Sea scrolls showed that our Hebrew texts of them are not different.

I am not sure how you read Athanasius' letter 39: here is an accessible version https://www.newadvent.org/fathers/2806039.htm

I do agree with you that "the Bible is a living document" but it lives because of the billions that read it and refer to it in myriad ways.

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Bishop in charge, Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, 2001–2019. French-American. Musician, composer, author, happily married. www.pierrewhalon.info

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Pierre Whalon

Bishop in charge, Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, 2001–2019. French-American. Musician, composer, author, happily married. www.pierrewhalon.info